About your Search

20130111
20130111
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
debates and votes you're talking have to do with fiscal issues taking place, whether it's debt ceiling, whether it's government spending and things like that. are you willing to see cuts in government spending? are you willing to see reforms in medicare and social security that deal with parts of this debt problem the country has? >> well, i'll tell you. i've always been an advocate for responsible spending. i think government needs to be delivering services for people in a cost effective way. and now we have not only an opportunity, but an obligation to do that. find ways to spend smarter. that's what i stood for in the state legislature, drill down into budgets, find ways to more effectively deliver for people. so that is absolutely what i'm committed to doing. you know, in my position, in addition to working on the task force on gun violence in the house, i'm also on transportation and infrastructure. and science. and those are two great persons to look for how we lay the foundation for economic growth, for jobs in our communities. and that is going to have to be key part of this ba
the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertwined. they represent different points from which you can have a conversation about spending. i actually think there is less pressure short-term from the budget year to year. it is the long-term entitlement programs. at the discretion of the congress on an annual basis, maybe only 40% of the budget they control. much of it is locked in and on a trajectory that ends badly at some 0.30 or 40 years. that objective statement comes from the president's own appointees. the presidents in both parties of had it trustees that say, this will not work long term. i think the logical approach will be to think, how can you now make some of these changes. in the 1980's they adjusted social security and medicare it is a little bit. those are phased in over a long period of time. host: what do you think about the idea of using the debt ceiling as a starting point to talk about budgets and spending? guest: there is no question that congress is in a brittle de
is doing here, i believe in the gun control issue and probably in the debt ceiling issue, doesn't that smack of totalitarianism? i'm not going to go with the checks and balances that the founding fathers put into place. i'm going to sign my name and you're gonna do it. >> well, we still have checks and balances. we still have the judiciary. any executive order can be challenged in court. the truth is that the courts have generally upheld executive orders finding them perfectly consistent with the constitution. they have done it on important issues, too. president truman used executive order to desegregate the military when congress wouldn't act. we have along history of executive orders even on constitutional issues. i don't think they violate the separation of powers. >> bill: you do see that it will wind up in court and it will be a mess and particularly on the gun issue. now, how do you see it coming down? let's take the guns first. the house is not going to go along with the president's overall view. they may make a couple of minor tweaks here and there how do you think the
's taking place in america right now. and we're hearing about fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and money here and there and cuts and whatnot. it is about what the republicans want to take from the lower-income americans. that is the issue. and our next guest, bernie sanders, wants action. and so do the american people. i was struck by his essay in the huffington post that was titled "the soul of america." so well put. because folks, this is, as i said, an ideological battle. and the deck is basically stacked against you if you're in the middle class or below that. we're experiencing more income inequality now than we have during any time in a period of history since 1928. the top 1% owns 42% of the country's financial wealth. 1% of americans own 42% of the country's wealth. as for the bottom 80%, they own only 5% of the wealth. yet despite those kinds of statistics, the republicans and the big money donors who back them are aiming for more. we've heard all the rhetoric. we don't have enough revenue. well, wait a minute. we've got too much revenue going in. it's a spending problem. but we all
that firing range. and we can ponder the oncoming train -- >> all aboard -- >> that is the debt ceiling debacle. or we can fall back on these themes i keep talking about, themes that give us a place to go within all the skirmishing that defines our marketplace day after day. we've gone over china, the banks, and housing. we've told you that the autos and insurance stocks should be bought on weakness and we said that aerospace can work. stay focused when your favorite companies in these sectors. and tonight i've got two new ones, two themes that aren't going away. if anything, i think they're accelerating in 2013. the first, when you speak of big themes, you cannot ignore the revolution in energy in this country. >> buy, buy, buy! >> we have so much of it, particularly so much natural gas, it will not be just 2013, 2012, but a multi-year game changer. while we're thrilled about the possible north american energy independence, and by the way, the american technology behind them, don't forget that, we need to ask, how can this theme make us money? i mean, this is "mad money," not mad energ
to the debt ceiling, but it didn't apply to the tax. >> sean: constitutionally, this is check mate, urge you to talk to your lawyer you probably talk to regularly, article 1, section 7 clearly spending begins in congress. >> it's clear that obamacare was not legal either. and excuse me, everybody sued and winning all the way up and a certain justice that was 100% against it who in order to become a favorite fair-haired boy in washington, went against his own beliefs, okay? >> what does it say about him if he's willing to circumvent the constitution? >> he's doing it and in my opinion for the debt ceiling he's going to use the 14th amendment and circumvent the problem. and i believe that the republicans are going to have a hard time. >> sean: coming up my sit-down with donald trump continues. does he have any regrets about not jumping into the 2012 presidential race? his surprising answer about that, bill maher and miss alabama straight ahead. she knows you like no one else. and you wouldn't have it any other way. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flo
have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertwined. they represent different points from which you can have a conversation about spending. i actually think there is less pressure short-term from the budget year to year. it is the long-term entitlement programs. at the discretion of the congress on an annual basis, maybe only 40% of the budget they control. much of it is locked in and on a trajectory that ends badly at some 0.30 or 40 years. that objective statement comes from the president's own appointees. the presidents in both parties of had it trustees that say, this will not work long term. i think the logical approach will be to think, how can you now make some of these changes. in the 1980's they adjusted social security and medicare it is a little bit. those are phased in over a long period of time. host: what do you think about the idea of using the debt ceiling as a starting point to talk about budgets and spending? guest: there is no question that congress is in a britt
could have been on the debt ceiling, if you put all that together, we cannot set back and be prepared for the worst in us were trying to do. >> having been a service chief come up with a mechanism and sequestration is established, we would have to absorb $52 billion in reductions piece of the started in october commutes are fixed to the number 12 months. in january europe's or 52 billion over nine months. in the start of march commutes 2 billion over six months or seven minutes. the permits and sustainable way to take measures to prepare ourselves for that eventuality. >> the fy 13 budget, were basically spending money pursuant to what we had in the fy 13 budget. and the fact is spending at this level and effort required to do this cut, suddenly we achieve this level of savings. where do we go? are going to protect the war fighter commits us in afghanistan. are going to protect this area is critical to national defense. so where do you go? u2 readiness, maintenance, training. this is where cuts are ultimately made. when that happens, it makes us less ready. >> $45 billion, not 52. >>
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)